Secret Sisters

Secret Sisters - Jayne Ann Krentz Secret Sisters by Jayne Ann Krentz

They knew his name, the man who tried to brutally attack twelve-year-old Madeline in her grandmother's hotel. They thought they knew his fate. He wouldn't be bothering them anymore...ever. Still their lives would never be the same.
Madeline has returned to Washington after her grandmother's mysterious death. And at the old, abandoned hotel—a place she never wanted to see again—a dying man’s last words convey a warning: the secrets she and Daphne believed buried forever have been discovered.
Now, after almost two decades, Madeline and Daphne will be reunited in friendship and in fear. Unable to trust the local police, Madeline summons Jack Rayner, the hotel chain’s new security expert. Despite the secrets and mysteries that surround him, Jack is the only one she trusts...and wants.
Jack is no good at relationships but he does possess a specific skill set that includes a profoundly intimate understanding of warped and dangerous minds. With the assistance of Jack's brother, Abe, a high-tech magician, the four of them will form an uneasy alliance against a killer who will stop at nothing to hide the truth...



My Review:
Secret Sisters was a total win for me. On all levels. The sibling/friendship and the romantic relationships all had their own merits and the sisterly bond snagged me from the beginning. I love the dynamic of the relationships and the stages they go through as they progress and the clues about the mystery secret belonging to their past begins to unravel.
Secret Sisters is a great tale of learning to trust and accepting your bonds with other people and how sometimes family isn't just about blood.
From beginning to end Secret Sisters keeps you intrigued in both its friendships, its romance, its family angle and the intrigue that draws them all together.
I loved this book.


My Rating:
5 Stars


Reviewed By: Krissy's Bookshelf Reviews
http://kkmalott.booklikes.com/


Note: I received a print copy in exchange for an honest review from Berkley/NAL/Penguin